New Insight Into How Immune Cells Are Formed

New Insight Into How Immune Cells Are Formed

After several attempts by various scientists and researchers, it is finally revealed that they have made a ground-breaking invention – The skin patch. It has the ability, not only to heal but also regrow damaged organs within a short span of time. The technology used to develop this is called (TNT) Tissue Nanotransfection. The technique is reprogramming of skin cells. Inducing pluripotent stem cells are the most common instances of reprogramming where the stem cells such as the blood or skin is converted to an embryonic stem cell by introducing it to some reprogramming genes to it. The method requires the path to be placed on the wound or target area and then removed. During this process, the chip injects a genetic code into the cells of the skin which helps restore the wounded/damaged blood vessels. The research team at Ohio State University were successful in restoring cognitive functions on lab mice with serious damage in its limbs.

The chip injects bits of DNA into the skin pores with just a shot of electricity. It is then, that the DNA drops its identity and reprograms itself to the certain cell type which can be further harvested to fix injured and severed organs. This technological advancement is likely to help in the reconstruction of damaged internal organs, restoration of old and aged tissues and in bringing relief in brain regeneration.

The Ohio team has built this device with silicone of the size of a stamp and it serves the purpose of a reservoir as well as an injector. It’s as small as a penny. It is micro-etched with several nano channels that help in connecting with the microscopic dents.

Another path-changing aspect about this invention is that it does not involve expensive cell isolating methods nor does it warrant tedious manipulation in the laboratory. This technology would use the patient’s skin itself for the conversion to take place and thus making the human skin a prolific bioreactor.

Researchers believe that if this technology is further bettered, it can help in a massive way in relieving and restoring cognitive functions and also help patients with Alzheimer, Parkinson disease as well as relieve brain tumors.

The team is now waiting for approval of human trials, as it uses the person’s own skin cells and doesn’t require external medication. This extensive research was led by Dr. Chandan Sen, Director of Centre of regenerative medicine and Cell-based Therapies and was funded by Leslie and Abigail Wexner, Ohio State’s Centre for Regenerative Medicine and Cell-Based Therapies and Ohio State’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Centre.

This invention can not only instil hope and faith in a lot of people but also help them recover and heal completely without having to go through an invasive surgery, but instead use their own living cells to heal themselves. According to Dr. Chandan, it will take a little longer to get the approval of FDA to start their human trials, following to the success of which, is the possibility of this technology being available for the masses.